timeout

ASP.NET Core Request Timeout IIS In-Process Mode

Over the years we’ve seen .NET mature and change since v1. We’ve seen server technologies mature in many ways. Things we did yesterday don’t necessarily work the same way today. One of those things that recently struck me was how request timeouts work in IIS. If like me, you just assumed they worked the same in .NET Core then I invite you to join me on this journey. Let’s explore how to make ASP.NET Core request timeouts work properly with IIS in-process hosting mode.

Windows Authentication in NET Core: Expanding Role-Based Security

I recently wrote about implementing Windows Authentication with React and .NET Core. Given the length of that post, I found it necessary to keep it bare bones. Today we’re going to talk about expanding our Windows Authentication in NET Core by adding role-based security.

.NET Core JSON Serialization Changes – Newtonsoft vs System.Text.Json

I’ve been using Microsoft .NET for a long time. I started my programming journey learning C# on .NET 1.0 right after it’s initial release. In that time I have only experienced a breaking change twice. Once with WCF configuration in my app.config, and recently with the JSON serialization (or deserialization, as it were). For those upgrading a .NET Core 2.x application to .NET Core 3.x, you’ll want to be aware of some changes in the defaults. Today let’s talk about .NET Core and how it handles JSON serialization (and deserialization).

Photo by Tianyi Ma on Unsplash

Mocking IQueryable Extensions with Moq

Unit testing is the base level of the testing pyramid and thus a vital cornerstone of effective software development. In order to effectively unit test your code you should make use of SOLID design principles and mocking frameworks. That said, it isn’t always easy to accomplish such as mocking IQueryable Extensions.

MSBuild error - This version of Microsoft.Web.Sdk used by this project is insufficient to support references to libraries targeting .NET Standard 1.5 or higher. Please install 2.0 or higher of the .NET Core SDK.

MsBuild error publishing ASP.NET MVC referencing .NET Standard library

Breathing new life into a “legacy” ASP.NET website is a way you can help slowly transition the site towards ASP.NET Core. One way you might accomplish that is by referencing .NET Standard libraries. Everything seems fine and dandy until you attempt a publish operation. Generally you might not notice these until running msbuild from command-line–such as in a CI environment, batch deploy script, or otherwise. Let’s talk about one major msbuild error you’ll encounter while publishing your ASP.NET MVC application that references a .NET standard library. We’ll also talk about some other errors that might arise in the process.

Satellite dishes

Using WCF With .NET Core

Recently I was going through the motions upgrading an ASP.NET Core 2.0 website to 2.2. Overall the process was fairly straightforward, minus some gotchas. We were attempting to switch the website from targeting the full framework (net47) to target netcoreapp2.2 but that caused a cascade of problems. One such problem was WCF. Today we’ll discuss using WCF with .NET Core and some of the gotchas you may run into.

Shipping containers

Session management in DotNetCore web applications

Last month we talked about Cookie management in DotNetCore web applications and introduced a generic cookie service. Today we’re going to look at an alternative option for storing user data. Session state is a server store of information linked to a browsing session. Today let’s look at a technique for generic session management in dotnetcore web applications.

Stoplight

Throttling requests in .NET Core web applications

Last year I worked on a team migrating a large application to ASP.NET Core from ASP.NET MVC 5. Among our goals we wanted to make the site use responsive layout, become “future-proofed” on a technology stack, and clean-up a bunch of legacy cruft. Our initial launch did not go smoothly and we reverted to the previous site to make changes. In the process we learned some “gotchas”.  Today I’m going to discuss one of those and how we addressed it. We’ll learn about throttling requests in .NET Core web applications.